Most rockets in Western attacks on Syria were intercepted: Russian Federation

Adjust Comment Print

Ankara said chemical weapons attacks that indiscriminately target civilians "constitute crimes against humanity" and should not go unpunished. There is no doubt in the worldwide community's conscience on this matter.

On Friday night, the U.S. President Donald Trump announced that the U.S., the United Kingdom and France jointly launched strikes targeting the Assad regime's alleged chemical weapons capabilities after a suspected chemical attack killed dozens outside of Damascus.

Russian President Vladimir Putin and his Turkish counterpart Recep Tayyip Erdogan held a phone conversation on Saturday, during which they discussed missile strikes of the United States and its allies on Syria and agreed to intensify bilateral cooperation aimed at political settlement of the Syrian crisis. Erdogan said that "the innocent Syrian people should have been defended long ago".

More news: Rajasthan Royals squad play drums in a fun session

"Instead of transferring a massive amount of resources to arms projects, let's use this wealth for the benefit of humanity", said the president.

Speaking at the sixth ordinary congress of the ruling Justice and Development (AK) Party in Istanbul, Yildirim said: "We see this [U.S. -led airstrikes] as a positive step but more needs to be done for lasting peace".

Bozdag stated that Turkey was informed about launch of the military operation in Syria, Turkish media reported on April 14.

More news: Twice as many Britons acquired another European Union citizenship in Brexit vote year

Turkey is a vocal critic of Assad's regime in Damascus and backed rebels fighting for his ouster bun recent months it has closely worked with Russian Federation for a political solution in Syria even though Moscow remains a chief ally of the regime.

"Erdoğan highlighted the importance of not escalating tensions in Syria even further [to Theresa May]", the report read.

More news: BBC presenter makes quite a splash . .

Comments