Republican infighting over immigration spills over with farm bill collapse

Adjust Comment Print

After a surprise defection by the Republican Freedom Caucus in the House, the five-year farm bill failed to pass on Friday. And the 213-198 tally included "nays" from some moderate Republicans, including Reps. McCarthy, Scalise and Jordan are among those considering becoming the next House speaker should Republicans maintain control over the House after the midterms when Ryan has announced he'll retire.

He said Democrats made an election-year decision to paint any farm bill from the Republican majority as cruel to the poor, and they offered few amendments when it was being crafted in committee.

Opposing the provision, Rep. Matt Cartwright (D-Pa.) said the farm bill should be a tool for protecting Americans.

Among the proposals in the failed bill were measures to increase protections for dairy farmers, including the Margin Protection Program that serves as an insurance program for low milk prices.

"For months, they've told us they are whipping Goodlatte", a senior GOP staffer told TheDCNF.

Chief Deputy Whip Patrick McHenry, R-N.C., said leaders believed they had the votes for the farm policy, but conservatives chose to wreak havoc anyway. "We must support our Nation's great farmers!"

More news: National Football League star JJ Watt offers to pay for Santa Fe funerals

"We need a bill that addresses the realities of farming and working on a farm", Rolph said.

The future of the bill is uncertain.

Now, however, Jeff Denham, a Republican from California and the leader of the moderate effort to bring an immigration debate to the floor, said that the Freedom Caucus' effort had thrown the entire negotiation into jeopardy. Even a couple hours prior to the vote, House GOP leaders were hoping to contain this uprising within the ranks. Those members, many running for re-election in competitive districts, are pressing, instead, for a vote on a measure that gives a path to citizenship for children of undocumented workers.

Two Arizona lawmakers were among the 30 Republicans who crossed the aisle and joined all Democrats to send the $868 billion farm bill to defeat in the House Friday.

With the bill's failure, prospects may darken for enacting a farm bill before the current legislation, enacted in 2014, expires in September. "It would have taken food assistance away from millions of Americans, weakened environmental stewardship of the nation's farmlands, and left ME farmers and rural communities ill-prepared for the challenges and the opportunities of the next five years".

Republicans and Trump want strict work requirements for people who receive those benefits, a plan Democrats reject. Without any Democratic votes, the bill did not have sufficient support to pass. The caucus members wanted a vote on a security-focused immigration bill, but House leadership doesn't think it would have enough votes to pass. And prior to that, they shut down the government over illegal aliens. "When you look at that, 24 percent of it actually is about farms and supporting our farmers".

More news: Reuben Foster's Ex-Girlfriend: Domestic Violence Claim 'A Money Scheme'

But food stamps are in the farm bill because of politics. And for decades, it worked.

"We call on all members of Congress not to use farmers and ranchers as pawns in a political game", Duvall said. "We were pushed away by an ideological fight I repeatedly warned the chairman not to start".

Peterson, of Minnesota, said he has worked with Republicans on every farm bill since the early 1990s. Republicans have yet to push the bill forward out of a belief that it would flop on a vote, and badly. "I would say that's a mistake in my view".

"I am willing to go back to the table to help them fix this". That's up to them. It sets up a system for SNAP recipients where if you are able to work, you should work to get the benefits.

"You see 7 out of 10 Democrats supporting these ideas", Rasmussen said in an interview. "Independents usually come in at 8 out of 10, Republicans 9 out of 10".

The five-year bill's ultimate fate was already cloudy, given the likelihood that a Senate version to be released in June will differ considerably on major points.

More news: Ocado Teams Up With Kroger: What The Analysts Said

Given that the Senate is working on its own version of a farm bill - one that has a less stringent approach on SNAP - it's a foregone conclusion that the House bill, should it pass, won't be the final say on the matter, with a possible House-Senate conference looming to hash out the significant differences.

Comments