Google to challenge home consoles with Yeti project

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At the Game Developers Conference in March of this year, Google representatives met with several big video game companies to gauge interest in its streaming platform, which is code-named Yeti, sources said.

According to Kotaku, who claim to have heard from sources who "have either been briefed on Google's plans or heard about them secondhand", Google now has a "three-pronged" strategy in place for a new gaming system to rival those now on the market.

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Google has already dipped a toe into seemingly every area of the tech industry, and now rumors indicate the mega-corporation wants to compete with companies like PlayStation and Xbox by creating its very own gaming platform. Rumors have also surfaced that Google is looking to purchase game development studios. There have been whispers about the project, codenamed Yeti, since February of this year when The Information reported it.

Google is looking to offer some sort of hardware, the report claims, but it unclear whether the company will be looking towards something like the Nvidia Shield or another Android TV-style device that could be used to stream the titles and connect various peripherals.

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Right now, any games industry domination is simply in the planning stages, according to "five people who have either been briefed on Google's plans or heard about them secondhand", Kotaku reports. While you'd never expect Google to join the gaming market given its nearly non-existent footprint in the industry, that's what a new report from Kotaku suggests, backed by five independent sources. Numerous rumors we've heard need to be presented with some skepticism until we actually see them in action. Moreover, it's also been trying to get some game studios to sign-up for its streaming service, while continuing to approach others for potential acquisitions. If you're stuck at a particular part of a game and need a few hints, you'll be able to activate an overlay with the press of a button that brings up a walkthrough of that game on YouTube. Of course, this would still require a strong internet connection. The streaming service would hypothetically allow you to play modern, graphics-intensive games without expensive hardware, as most of the processing work would be done remotely. While some might speculate that Google could attempt to take on Microsoft and Sony by offering a competitive console, it seems also likely that they could just offer a simple system ideal for streaming with Yeti.

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