Scientists Spot Massive Rogue Planet Just Outside Solar System

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Researchers are working to explain the presence of a mysterious large object floating outside the solar system that may be a rogue planet, RT reported.

They're dubbing it "rogue" because it's mysteriously "drifting" through space without any kind of orbit around a parent star. The latest data reveals it's younger than first thought at a relatively youthful 200 million years old, and its mass is smaller, so it could be classified as a planet. Brown dwarf planets are sometimes called "failed stars" because they're almost large enough for fusion to begin taking place in their core, but that's not even the most unique thing about this particular planet. It's a massive 200 times the strength of Jupiter's magnetic field.

Astronomers using NSF's Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array have detected a "rogue" planetary-mass object with a surprisingly powerful magnetic field.

At just 20 light years from home, this marks the first planetary-mass object that has ever been detected using radio telescopy.

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Though it was first detected in 2016, scientists initially identified it as one of five recently discovered brown dwarfs.

"They [the surprises] can potentially help us understand magnetic processes on both stars and planets".

But as far as we know, brown dwarfs aren't in the vicinity of any stellar winds, making their auroras something of a puzzle.

On the team with Kao and Hallinan were J. Sebastian Pineda, now at the University of Colorado Boulder, David Stevenson of Caltech, and Adam Burgasser of the University of California San Diego.

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At 12.7 times more massive than Jupiter, it's right on the upper limit for planets - verging into brown dwarf territory.

However, recent VLA observations have uncovered that SIMP J01365663+0933473 is too lightweight to be a brown dwarf.

"This particular object is exciting because studying its magnetic dynamo mechanisms can give us new insights on how the same type of mechanisms can operate in extrasolar planets - planets beyond our solar system", said Kao. It's an absolutely massive alien world that is almost big enough to be classified as a brown dwarf.

Brown dwarf masses are notoriously hard to measure, and at the time, the object was thought to be an old and much more massive brown dwarf.

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It also boasts scorching surface temperatures of around 1,500 degrees Fahrenheit. It is a component of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO).

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