Planet has only until 2030 to stem catastrophic climate change, experts warn

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A limit of 1.5° in global warming is feasible - but will still have far greater implications than previously thought, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), while inaction will have major consequences. "If the current warming rate continues, the world would reach human-induced global warming of 1.5°C around 2040".

This would mean replacing petrol and diesel cars with electric vehicles or other clean alternatives and scrapping the use of gas boilers in homes in just a few decades.

In an IPCC press conference Monday morning in Korea, Imperial College London's Jim Skea took a question about the importance of reforestation vs. fossil fuel cuts as an opportunity to summarize the report's basic message: "S$3 aying "option x or option y" is not the way that this report is framed".

The report is sensitive to the fact that changes required to meet 1.5℃ must be consistent with the UN's wider sustainable development goals.

The planet is already two-thirds of the way there, with global temperatures having warmed about 1 degree C. If we eliminated all our emissions today, we would still see a bit more warming (as sunlight-reflecting aerosol pollution quickly washed out of the atmosphere, for example) but probably not enough to send us coasting helplessly across the 1.5°C limit.

Brown said in response to the IPCC report that "the big powers - the United States, China, India and the European Union - must show the way".

The report is set to lay out four scenarios that could result in Earth's average surface temperature stabilising at 1.5°C.

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"The best way to remove carbon dioxide from the air", explains MIT engineer Howard Herzog in his book Carbon Capture, is "to not release it into the air in the first place", Joyce reports.

Dr Jenifer Baxter, head of engineering at the UK's Institution of Mechanical Engineers, said the IPCC's target to generate 70-80% electricity from renewables is ambitious, adding there is a need to "look at the broader picture" and focus on reducing the carbon intensity of the whole electricity system.

There's only twelve years left to avert climate change disaster, and Scott Morrison's still throwing around words like "nonsense".

But while the warnings about the dangers of letting temperatures go beyond 1.5C are dire, the report says, surprisingly perhaps, that the world can keep below the limit. The IPCC 1.5 report starkly illustrates the difference between temperature rises of 1.5°C and 2°C-for many around the world this is a matter of life and death.

To prevent 2.7 degrees of warming, the report said, greenhouse pollution must be reduced by 45 percent from 2010 levels by 2030, and 100 percent by 2050.

While more than 180 countries have accepted the report's summary, the USA (which is the second biggest emitter in the world) said that their acceptance of the report does not "imply endorsement" of the findings.

Sea level rises would be 10cm lower with a 1.5C temperature rise compared to 2C by 2100, while there would be worse impacts on coral reefs and the Arctic at higher temperatures.

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Debra Roberts, co-chair of IPCC Working Group II (which assesses the impacts of climate change) said the report gives policymakers and practitioners "the information they need to make decisions that tackle climate change while considering local context and people's needs".

Yesterday, the United Nations released a terrifying report about climate change, which basically said we've got around 12 years left to keep climate change to a minimum. Human activities have caused warming of about 1.8 degrees since about the 1850s, the beginning of large-scale industrial coal burning, the report found.

The land area at risk is projected to be approximately 50 per cent lower at 1.5°C compared to 2°C.

Reining in the emissions of another greenhouse gas, methane, from the cultivation of cattle, rice and other agricultural products - even as farmers need to feed a growing global population.

Impacts ranging from increased droughts and water scarcity to extreme weather, spread of diseases such as malaria, economic damage, and harm to yields of maize, rice and wheat will be less severe at 1.5C than 2C.

"With the outlook that we're seeing, we can't see any reason why anyone would be wanting to develop any significant and expensive thermal coal deposits", he said.

The report fired up activists even as critics dismissed the deadline as another arbitrary "climate tipping point", as Climate Depot's Marc Morano put it.

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