Trump denies collusion after major revelations in Russian Federation probe

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The separate filings came from special counsel Robert Mueller and federal prosecutors in NY ahead of Wednesday's sentencing of Trump's former personal lawyer, Michael Cohen. "Thank you!" Mr. Trump tweeted shortly after the filing. They said his sentence should reflect a "modest" reduction from the four to five years they said federal guidelines would suggest.

Cohen pleaded guilty to financial crimes in a federal court in NY in August and last week pleaded guilty to lying to Congress in a case brought by Mueller.

Cohen, dubbed Trump's "legal fixer" in the past, also described his work in conjunction with Trump in orchestrating hush money payments to two women - a porn star and a Playboy model - who said they had sex with Trump a decade earlier.

Alan Dershowitz joined the "Fox & Friends" co-hosts Saturday morning to share his key takeaways from Special Counsel Robert Mueller's court filings.

The special counsel's office said Cohen had provided "useful information" about its ongoing probe of Russian interference in the 2016 election, as well as "relevant information" about his contacts with people connected to the White House between 2017 and 2018.

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Trump's spokeswoman Sarah Sanders dismissed the latest filings in Cohen's case, saying they "tell us nothing of value that wasn't already known". His lawyers want the 52-year-old attorney to avoid prison time altogether.

Mueller said Cohen also shared information about his own contacts "with Russian interests during the campaign and discussions with others in the course of making those contacts". Trump is identified in this and other filings by US attorneys as "Individual-1", who "was elected President".

"In total, the prosecutors seem to be saying the president was more aware than he has claimed to be", former federal prosecutor Michael Zeldin said.

"Time for the Witch Hunt to END!"

Federal prosecutors said Cohen made the payments in "coordination with and the direction of" Trump.

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In an additional filing Friday evening, prosecutors said former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort lied to them about his contacts with a Russian associate and Trump administration officials.

The White House similarly dismissed that filing, arguing it "says absolutely nothing about the President".

Manafort, who has pleaded guilty to several counts, violated his plea agreement by then telling "multiple discernible lies" to prosecutors, they said.

Cohen wanted to obscure from Congress and the public that if the project had been completed, Trump's company "could have received hundreds of millions of dollars from Russian sources in licensing fees and other revenues", prosecutors wrote. But the NY prosecutors were unsparing in their descriptions of his conduct, saying he was motivated by "personal greed" and that he "repeatedly used his power and influence for deceptive ends". Though Cohen had previously implicated Trump in the payments, the prosecutors now are linking Trump to the scheme and backing up Cohen's allegations.

This filing does not constitute a charge against the president, but it implies that prosecutors have the evidence in hand beyond Cohen's admissions to make such a frank statement. It never took place.

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