Super moon offers unbelievable early morning spectacle

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Durango-area residents were treated to a rare celestial event Sunday night known as a "super blood wolf moon" lunar eclipse. At the peak of the spectacle, sunlight passed through Earth's atmosphere and lit the moon, making it appear to glow red.

Even in Seattle, where the weather forecast wasn't promising, the hours-long progression from supersized full moon to a ruddy darkness and back to lunar brightness unfolded in mostly clear skies.

The total lunar eclipse, which happens less than once per year on average, coincided at the same time as a supermoon, which occurs when the moon is full and closest to Earth in orbit. The moniker "wolf moon" was given because it appeared in January, when hungry wolves would howl outside villages in days gone by.

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Europeans last saw a total lunar eclipse in July 2018.

"The Sun's red light is scattered much less by air, and is bent by Earth's atmosphere in a process called refraction, travelling all the way through it to light up the Moon's surface".

The "super blood wolf moon" captured from Lowestoft this morning.

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Lunar eclipses can only take place when a full moon occurs around a lunar node, the point where the two orbital planes meets. Instead tribes gave each full moon a nickname to keep track of the seasons and lunar months.

Blood moons and lunar eclipses of the past Christopher Columbus, an Italian explorer, created fear in 1504 after he used knowledge of an upcoming blood moon to convince the Arawak Indians to help him while stranded in Jamaica.

Total or partial lunar eclipses happen at least twice a year on average, Florent Deleflie, an astronomer at the Observatory of Paris-PSL said.

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