'Heartfelt grief and sorrow' - Pacific pledges solidarity after Christchurch mosque attacks

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A lone gunman killed 49 people and wounded more than 20 at two Christchurch mosques on Friday in a shooting which Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern condemned as "a terrorist attack". "Two do remain critical, and we also have one child being well looked after at hospital in Christchurch".

New Zealand mosque attacks: Brenton Harrison Tarrant live-streamed for about 17 minutes his rampage through two mosques.

Judge Paul Kellar said although Tarrant was facing only one murder charge, it was "reasonable to assume there will be other charges".

Police said three people were in custody.

Residents pay their respects by placing flowers for the victims of the mosques attacks in Christchurch.

It is understood that the killers of the terror attacks have legitimate gun license. Our gun laws will change, ' she declared during a news conference. But he said some people frustrated because "they want to get on with their grieving process".

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The police initially said that four people had been detained in the wake of the attacks.

Tarrant, handcuffed and wearing a white prison suit, stood silently in the Christchurch District Court where he was remanded without a plea.

"While work has been done as to the chain of events that led to both the holding of this gun licence and the possession of these weapons, I can tell you one thing right now: our gun laws will change", Ardern told reporters. "Rhetoric of racism, division and extremism has no place not only in New Zealand but I would say in a society as a whole".

"What I can say is that an 18-year- old man will appear in court on Monday but that arrest was tangential to this matter and we do not believe that he was involved in this attack either", Mr Bush said.

"At just that moment, there was one young guy who usually takes care of the mosque and helps with parking and other stuff, so (the man) saw an opportunity and he pounced over to him and grabbed his gun".

Within hours of the massacre that killed 50 people, New Zealand Prime Minister, Jacinda Ardern, promised to change the country's gun laws, though she didn't immediately specify how.

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This handout picture released by the office of New Zealand Prime Minister shows New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern meeting with the representatives of the refugee centre during a visit to the Canterbury Refugee Centre in Christchurch on March 16, 2019.

Greenhill described "acts of heroism" and "selflessness" by the people attacked on Friday afternoon, including one man who was killed trying to disarm a gunman at the second mosque.

The attacker, identified by authorities as Australia-born Brenton Tarrant, 28, reportedly targeted immigrants during Friday prayers.

Business Standard reports that Tarrant allegedly used "two semi-automatic rifles, two shotguns and a lever-action weapon".

Tarrant posted a manifesto online before the attack, suggesting a racially-motivated act of terrorism. Armed police were deployed at several locations in all cities, unusual in a country where levels of gun violence are low.

"As soon as New Zealanders hear that someone was legally able to acquire, as I'm advised, those weapons and carry out this event, that will raise enormous questions with our gun laws, and that is why we will respond swiftly", she explained.

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